Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Throughout the 2021-22 academic year, we will be prioritising face to face teaching as part of a blended learning approach that builds on the lessons learned over the course of the Coronavirus pandemic. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

GD204-30 Health and Sustainable Development

Department
Global Sustainable Development
Level
Undergraduate Level 2
Module leader
Marco Haenssgen
Credit value
30
Module duration
20 weeks
Assessment
100% coursework
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module offers an in-depth examination of Sustainable Development Goal 3 (“good health and well-being”) and the broader field of global health. This two-term module involves a blend of conceptual foundations, case study analysis, and work with real-life qualitative and quantitative data. Teaching and case studies are interdisciplinary, drawing on medical as well as social science research. Both terms are alone-standing but complement each other.

Module web page

Module aims

Term 1 introduces the concept and dimensions of global health and equips students with a big-picture understanding of health governance and health systems. A broad range of global health priorities within and beyond the Sustainable Development Goals will further enable students to grasp and discuss key issues that will dominate global health in the coming decades (e.g. universal healthcare, antimicrobial resistance), their relationship to international development and other sustainable development goals, and their global and local dimensions.

Term 2 will focus on cross-cutting issues that consistently intersect global health issues and policies. The first half of the term will explore human behaviour and contextual influences thereof through case studies like anti-vaccine movements and precarious living environments. The second half of the term will address health policy and interventions, covering among others tensions between local and global health knowledge, unintended consequences of health policy implementation, and methods to evaluate health interventions.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

The module covers four main topics within the subject of Health and Sustainable Development.
Following an introduction to global health and development in Term 1, we examine,

  • Polity and Governance (Weeks 2 and 3): We explore the global and local governance (or absence thereof) of health, historical trajectories that define current governance arrangements and the structures of national health systems.
  • Global health priorities (Weeks 4 to 10): We will study specific topics of global health within the Sustainable Development Goal 3 (e.g. universal healthcare, health emergency preparedness) and topics outside the SDGs that are likely to dominate global health agendas in the coming decades (e.g. multimorbidity, antimicrobial resistance).

Term 2 will first introduce students to cross-cutting issues in health and sustainable development to interrogate and challenge current global health practice. We study these issues in detail in the remainder of the term:

  • Behaviour and Context (Weeks 2 to 5): Health policy often makes strong simplifying assumptions about human behaviour. We will explore ways in which we can conceptualise behaviour and analyse case studies on topics such as the politicisation of vaccines and the influences of precarity on treatment-seeking behaviour.
  • Policy and intervention (Weeks 6 to 10): We will revisit the policy process underlying global health, in which we scrutinise discourses, power, implementation dynamics, unintended (and often obscured) side-effects of health interventions, and methods to evaluate health policy and interventions.

Throughout the module, students will explore case studies from across the globe, covering low-, middle-, and high-income contexts. Seminars will also emphasise the use of data to inform our understanding of global and local health problems.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate economic, social, environmental, and governance dimensions of global health issues
  • Understand and evaluate un/-intended outcomes of health interventions and policies
  • Develop balanced and theoretically grounded arguments on the potential and limitations of technical solutions for health problems
  • Critically analyse the ways in which development processes and contextual change affect people’s health
  • Apply qualitative and quantitative research methods to global health issues
Indicative reading list

A module reader will be collated and its readings published on Moodle. A sample of the reading is provided below:

Recommended Reading
Randall, M. P. (2016). A history of global health: interventions into the lives of other peoples. Baltimore, MA: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Birn, A.-E., Pillay, Y., & Holtz, T. H. (2018). Textbook of global health (4th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
Adams, V. (Ed.). (2016). Metrics: what counts in global health. Durham: Duke University Press.
Hanefeld, J. (Ed.). (2015). Globalization and health (2nd ed.). Maidenhead: Open University Press.
O’Manique, C., & Fourie, P. (Eds.). (2018). Global health and security: critical feminist perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge.
McElroy, A., & Townsend, P. K. (2015). Medical anthropology in ecological perspective (6th ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview.

Further Reading
Criado Perez, C. (2019). Invisible women: data bias in a world designed for men. New York, NY: Abrams Press.
Parker, R., & García, J. (Eds.). (2019). Routledge handbook on the politics of global health. Abingdon: Routledge.
Lee, K., & Collin, J. (Eds.). (2005). Global change and health. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
Banerjee, A. V., & Duflo, E. (2011). Poor economics: a radical rethinking of the way to fight global poverty (1st ed.). New York: PublicAffairs.
Joralemon, D. (2017). Exploring medical anthropology (4th ed.). London: Routledge.
Bulled, N. (Ed.). (2017). Thinking through resistance: a study of public oppositions to contemporary global health practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Research element

Research skills are embedded into the teaching strategy of the module. By the end of the module student will be enabled to apply qualitative and quantitative research methods to global health issues.

Interdisciplinary

This is an optional core module on the Global Sustainable Development course which adopts an interdisciplinary approach spanning the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences fields in order to engage with the major global challenges facing contemporary society, explore these 'big problems,' from a variety of perspectives and consider a range of possible solutions. Specifically, for this module, teaching and case studies are interdisciplinary, drawing on medical as well as social science research.

International

This is an optional core module on the Global Sustainable Development course which offers a unique trans-disciplinary and international learning experience that allows students to achieve breadth and depth of knowledge.

Subject specific skills

Ability to:
critically assess and analyse sustainability issues that need to be addressed, including real-life examples;

use and apply established frameworks and methodologies for analysing the impact(s) of a behaviour or process;

generate and evaluate different models of sustainable development to assess their likely impact;

actively implement or contribute to changes that promote sustainable development within the scope of own learning experience;

engage with real-life problems relevant to sustainable development;

use historical knowledge and an understanding of the consequences of past actions to envision how futures may be shaped;

identify the importance of empowering individuals and organisations to work together to create new knowledge;

employ leadership for sustainable development by challenging assumptions and negotiating alternatives to unsustainable current practices;

identify the opportunities to support and develop a progressive and resilient culture that encourages citizens, professions and institutions to put learning into practice.

Transferable skills

Written communication skills
Oral communication skills
Working with others
Problem solving
Information technology
Numeracy
Research across various disciplines

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 20 sessions of 1 hour (7%)
Practical classes 20 sessions of 1 hour 30 minutes (10%)
Private study 250 hours (83%)
Total 300 hours
Private study description

Reading and research in preparation for workshops.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group A2
Weighting Study time
Case Study Analysis 1 (2000 words) 25%
Case Study Analysis 2 (2000 words) 25%
Research Paper (4000 words) 50%
Feedback on assessment

All feedback will be provided via tabula; individual face-to-face feedback sessions will be offered to each student.

Courses

This module is Core for:

  • Year 2 of UIPA-L8N1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development and Business
  • Year 2 of UIPA-R4L8 Undergraduate Hispanic Studies and Global Sustainable Development

This module is Core optional for:

  • Year 2 of UIPA-L1L8 Undergraduate Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-XL38 Undergraduate Education Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-L8A1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-L8N1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development and Business
  • Year 2 of UIPA-R4L8 Undergraduate Hispanic Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-V1L8 Undergraduate History and Global Sustainable Development
  • UIPA-C1L8 Undergraduate Life Sciences and Global Sustainable Development
    • Year 2 of C1L8 Life Sciences and Global Sustainable Development
    • Year 2 of C1LA Life Sciences and Global Sustainable Development: Biological Sciences
    • Year 2 of C1LB Life Sciences and Global Sustainable Development: Ecology
  • Year 2 of UIPA-V5L8 Undergraduate Philosophy and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-L2L8 Undergraduate Politics, International Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-C8L8 Undergraduate Psychology and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-L3L8 Undergraduate Sociology and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 2 of UIPA-W4L8 Undergraduate Theatre and Performance Studies and Global Sustainable Development

This module is Optional for:

  • Year 2 of UIPA-L8A1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development