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Throughout the 2021-22 academic year, we will be prioritising face to face teaching as part of a blended learning approach that builds on the lessons learned over the course of the Coronavirus pandemic. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

GD104-15 Economic Principles of Global Sustainable Development

Department
Global Sustainable Development
Level
Undergraduate Level 1
Module leader
Marta Guerriero
Credit value
15
Assessment
60% coursework, 40% exam
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module aims to introduce students to some of the key economic concepts and perspectives related to global sustainable development. In particular, by adopting problem-based learning as a teaching and learning model, it examines the relationship between Economics and Public Policy in sustainable development, and the ways in which economists address real-world dilemmas linked to sustainable development.

Module web page

Module aims

This module aims to introduce students to some of the key economic concepts and perspectives related to global sustainable development. In particular, by adopting problem-based learning as a teaching and learning model, it examines the relationship between Economics and Public Policy in sustainable development, and the ways in which economists address real-world dilemmas linked to sustainable development.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

An Introduction to Global Sustainable Development in Economics

  • How Do Economists Measure Sustainable Development?

The 'Fundamental' Determinants of Economic Development: Geography vs. Institutions

Economic Development, Poverty and the Environment

The Economic Case for Sustainable Development Intervention: Market Failure

  • Externalities. Human Capital Investment
  • The 'Tragedy of the Commons'. Environmental Quality
  • Risk and Uncertainty. Land Productivity
  • Asymmetric Information. Access to Credit

The Economic Case for Sustainable Development Intervention: Governance Failure

  • The Principal-Agent Approach to Governance
Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Apply fundamental economic principles and techniques to the analysis of global sustainable development problems and describe how economic activity relates to social and environmental development
  • Understand the basic measures of economic development, criticise these methods, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of alternative frameworks to measure sustainable economic progress
  • Understand some of the most important economic cases for sustainable development policy intervention, such as theories of externalities, theories of ethics and efficiency, game theoretical explanations of collective outcomes, theories of property rights and decision-making under risk and uncertainty
  • Interpret abstract economic models and apply basic quantitative information about global sustainability towards explaining and evaluating policy design
  • Demonstrate an ability to undertake independent learning and research.
Indicative reading list
  • Acemoglu, D. and Robinson, J. (2012) Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. Profile Books.
  • Banerjee, A.V. and Duflo, E. (2011) Poor Economics. Penguin Books.
  • Hanley, N., Shrogen, J. and White, B. (2013). Introduction to Environmental Economics, Oxford University Press.
  • Jackson, T. (2011) Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet, Routledge.
  • Ostrom, E. (2012) Understanding Institutional Diversity.
  • Sachs, J.D. (2015). The Age of Sustainable Development, Columbia University Press.
  • Stern, N. (2006) Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change.
  • Todaro, M.P. and Smith, S.C. (2015). Economic Development, Pearson.
    Additional journal articles and resources will be made available on the Moodie site.

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Interdisciplinary

This is a core module on the Global Sustainable Development course which adopts an interdisciplinary approach spanning the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences fields in order to engage with the major global challenges facing contemporary society, explore these 'big problems,' from a variety of perspectives and consider a range of possible solutions.

Subject specific skills

Apply fundamental economic principles and techniques to the analysis of global sustainable development problems and describe how economic activity relates to social and environmental development.
Understand the basic measures of economic development, criticise these methods, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of alternative frameworks to measure sustainable economic progress.
Understand some of the most important economic cases for sustainable development policy intervention, such as theories of externalities, theories of ethics and efficiency, game theoretical explanations of collective outcomes, theories of property rights and decision-making under risk and uncertainty.
Interpret abstract economic models and apply basic quantitative information about global sustainability towards explaining and evaluating policy design.

Transferable skills

Ability to undertake independent learning and research.

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 9 sessions of 1 hour (32%)
Seminars 10 sessions of 1 hour 30 minutes (54%)
Other activity 4 hours (14%)
Total 28 hours
Private study description

Reading and preparation for workshops

Other activity description

2x2-hour roundtable discussion sessions.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Students can register for this module without taking any assessment.

Assessment group D1
Weighting Study time
Group presentation 20%
Essay 40%
Online Examination 40%

2-hour online examination

~Platforms - AEP


  • Online examination: No Answerbook required
Feedback on assessment

All feedback will be published on Tabula; individual consultations will be set up for face-to-face feedback.

Past exam papers for GD104

Post-requisite modules

If you pass this module, you can take:

  • GD216-15 Good Governance and Sustainable Development
  • GD315-15 Multilingualism and Sustainable Development

Courses

This module is Core for:

  • Year 1 of UIPA-L1L8 Undergraduate Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-XL38 Undergraduate Education Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-L8A1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-L8N1 Undergraduate Global Sustainable Development and Business
  • Year 1 of UIPA-R4L8 Undergraduate Hispanic Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-V1L8 Undergraduate History and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-C1L8 Undergraduate Life Sciences and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-V5L8 Undergraduate Philosophy and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-L2L8 Undergraduate Politics, International Studies and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-C8L8 Undergraduate Psychology and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-L3L8 Undergraduate Sociology and Global Sustainable Development
  • Year 1 of UIPA-W4L8 Undergraduate Theatre and Performance Studies and Global Sustainable Development