Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Throughout the 2021-22 academic year, we will be prioritising face to face teaching as part of a blended learning approach that builds on the lessons learned over the course of the Coronavirus pandemic. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

WM00F-15 Resource Management in Healthcare Service Delivery

Department
WMG
Level
Taught Postgraduate Level
Module leader
Nancy Olson
Credit value
15
Module duration
1 week
Assessment
Multiple
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

Healthcare organisations and industries increasingly have to deal with both planned and disruptive change and innovation. Recent policy changes (e.g. NHS Healthcare Reform: Health and Social Care Act 2012, NHS 5 Year forward view 2015-2020) are driving major transformation in healthcare services. Within this context, managers and leaders are being tasked with improving quality of care and delivering operational efficiencies. Module materials aim to provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate a range of options, mechanisms, resourcing implications, and frameworks for planning, implementing and managing innovation. Through the use of case studies and lectures, the module provides students with a theoretical foundation in patient-centred service, concepts of value, service innovations and resourcing considerations. Students will be equipped to examine and develop the ‘business case’, blueprint, and evaluate options for resource allocation and risk management in a health sector ecosystem. They will also be able to define and implement measures for strategic objectives, value (benefits), outcomes, and outputs. Implementation frameworks and methods such as programmes, portfolios, projects and initiatives will be examined and their applicability to various contexts evaluated.

Module aims

Healthcare organisations and industries increasingly have to deal with both planned and disruptive change and innovation. Recent policy changes (e.g. NHS Healthcare Reform: Health and Social Care Act 2012, NHS 5 Year forward view 2015-2020) are driving major transformation in healthcare services. Within this context, managers and leaders are being tasked with improving quality of care and delivering operational efficiencies. Module materials aim to provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate a range of options, mechanisms, resourcing implications, and frameworks for planning, implementing and managing innovation. Through the use of case studies and lectures, the module provides students with a theoretical foundation in patient-centred service, concepts of value, service innovations and resourcing considerations. Students will be equipped to examine and develop the ‘business case’, blueprint, and evaluate options for resource allocation and risk management in a health sector ecosystem. They will also be able to define and implement measures for strategic objectives, value (benefits), outcomes, and outputs. Implementation frameworks and methods such as programmes, portfolios, projects and initiatives will be examined and their applicability to various contexts evaluated.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

  1. Introduction and welcome
  • Introductions
  • Module topics, learning outcomes
  • Agreeing Expectations
  1. Healthcare Service Delivery – Context, Drivers and Enablers of change
  • Governments, Policies, Market-mechanisms
  • Service Innovations, patient pathways, patient centred services
  • Resource allocation, commissioning and health sector ‘ecosystems’, networks and constellations
  • Leading vs Managing change – Incremental, transformational, disruptive
  • Case Studies & Exercises
  1. Stakeholder Engagement & Value
  • Concepts of Human Values Instrumental and Terminal (After Rokeach, 1973)
  • Economic Value vs Worth
  • Stakeholder concepts of value, values and risk
  • Stakeholder ‘What’s In It for Me?” (WIFFMs), Motivators/De-motivators
  • Stakeholder mapping techniques, Socio-dynamics
  • Reputation, Relationships and Risk Management
  • Case Studies & Exercises
  1. Service Design and Innovation
  • Models & Dimensions of service Innovation
  • Human element in Value co-creation (value as phenomenological )
  • Value Co-creation , Touchpoints & Value-In-use
  • Experienced Based Design (EBD)
  • Self-service and Technology Innovations
  • Blueprinting services
  • Case studies & Exercises
  1. Implementing change, innovation and transformational change
  • Planned vs emergent change, disruptions
  • Portfolio/Programme/Project/ Operations as usual
  • Understanding and evaluating approaches
  • Case studies & Exercises
  1. Portfolios and Programme Management
  • Programme framework/Change management/governance
  • Vision and Values, Blueprinting ‘As-is’ an ‘To-Be’
    o Value, Benefits, Outcomes, Outputs
    o Value, Benefits Management & Measurement (KPI/Scorecards/Metrics)
    o Benefit types, Social return on Investment (SROI)
  • The ‘Journey Map’ & options analysis, sourcing
  • Business Case –Justification and estimation, risk management
  • Governance Arrangements & strategies; Roles & responsibilities
  • Readiness for Change
  • Case studies & Exercises
  1. Projects & Project Dossier
  • Getting the objective right
  • Monitoring , Transition & embedding
  • Case studies & exercises
  1. Sourcing Options and Considerations – Relationships, Reputation and Risk
  2. Bringing it all together- Reflections in action
  • Case studies & presentations
  1. PMA, Module Review & student reflection on learning
Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical knowledge of strategic planning and decision making in the healthcare sector
  • Understand and explore the use of various resources that are vital to the success of a healthcare organization
  • Understand the critical steps necessary in successful planning process, and recognise and appraise the human, financial and organisational implications of programme strategy options and the decision-making processes in complex and uncertain situations
  • Conduct critical analysis of programme and project plans in the context of improving health service delivery.
  • Be able to identify resources for strategic planning and projects
  • Apply critical thinking skills in financial management, human resourcing, operational improvement, and strategic planning.
Indicative reading list

This reading list is INDICATIVE only. This is a Masters-level module. There is no single reference text for this course. Students are expected to read widely and to use or cite relevant journal articles. Several journal papers will be added to Moodle as a starting point.
Barlow, J., & Köberle-Gaiser, M. (2008). The private finance initiative, project form and design innovation: The UK's hospitals programme. Research Policy, 37(8), 1392-1402.
Bartlett, J. (2002). Managing Programmes of Business Change: A Handbook of the Principles of Programme Management. Project Manager Today Publications.
Brown, J.T (2014) The Handbook of Program Management: How to Facilitate Project Success with Optimal Program Management, McGraw-Hill Professional; 2nd Second Edition
Brown, K., & Osborne, S. P. (2012). Managing change and innovation in public service organizations. Routledge.
César, B. (1998). Managing sensitive projects: A lateral approach. Psychology Press.
Dickinson, H & Mannion,R. (2012) The Reform of Health Care: Shaping, Adapting and Resisting Policy Developments. Palgrave Macmillan,
Chesbrough H (2010). Business Model Innovation: Opportunities and Barriers. Long Range Planning 43, 354-363.
Gollenia, M. L. A., & Uhl, A. (Eds.). (2012). Business Transformation Management Methodology. Gower Publishing, Ltd.
Grönroos, C., & Voima, P. (2013). Critical service logic: making sense of value creation and co-creation. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 41(2), 133-150.
Hillson, D., & Murray-Webster, R. (2007). Understanding and managing risk attitude. Gower Publishing, Ltd.
Littau,P. Jujagiri, N., Adlbrecht, G., (2010) “25 Years of Stakeholder Theory in Project Management Literature (1984-2009)”, Project Management Journal, Sept 2010.
Lusch RF & Vargo SL, Eds. (2006) The Service-Dominant Logic of Marketing: Dialog, Debate and Directions, New York: M.E. Sharpe.
Merna, T., & Al-Thani, F. F. (2011). Corporate risk management. John Wiley & Sons.
Muller, R. (2009) Project Governance: Fundamentals of Project Management, Gower Publications
Nenonen S & Storbacka K (2009). Business model design: conceptualising networked value co-creation. In The 2009 Naples Forum on Services: Service-Dominant Logic, Service Science, and Network Theory Naples.
Ng I, Maull R & Yip N. (2009). Outcome-based contracts as a driver for systems thinking and service-dominant logic in service science: Evidence from the defence industry. European Management Journal, 27(6), 377–387.
Normann R (2001). Reframing business: When the map changes the landscape. Wiley. Com
Office of Government Commerce. (2011). Managing successful programmes. The Stationery Office.
Omachonu, V. K., & Einspruch, N. G. (2010). Innovation in healthcare delivery systems: A conceptual framework. The Innovation Journal: The Public Sector Innovation Journal, 15(1), 1-20.
Payne A, Storbacka K & Frow P (2008). Managing the co-creation of value. Academy of Marketing Science, 36(1), 83–96

Pellegrinelli, S. Partington,D., Hemingway, C., Mohdzain,Z.,& Mahmood Shah (2007) "The importance of context in programme management: An empirical review of programme practices." International Journal of Project Management 25, no. 1 (2007): 41-55.
Raz, T., & Hillson, D. (2005). A comparative review of risk management standards. Risk Management, 53-66.
Reiss, G. & Raynor, P. (2012) Portfolio and Programme Management Demystified: Managing Multiple Projects Successfully, Routledge; 2nd edition
Turner, R. (2003) Contracting for Project Management, Gower Publishing Ltd; New edition: Sep 2003
Walley, P (2013) “Stakeholder management: the socio-dynamic approach”, International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, Vol. 6 No. 3, 2013, pp. 485-504
Vargo SL, Maglio PP & Akaka MA (2008). On value and value co-creation: A service systems and service logic perspective. European Management Journal, 26, 145– 152.
Williams, D, & Parr, T. (2003). Enterprise programme management: delivering value. Palgrave Macmillan.
Zott C, Amit R & Massa L (2011). The Business Model: Recent Developments and Future Research. Journal of Management, 37 (4), 1019-42

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Subject specific skills

Strategic and organisational awareness, planning techniques, prioritisation, stakeholder analysis and engagement, decision-making and common biases and heuristics, problem definition and problem solving, risk management methods and techniques, service systems, programmes and project management, resource management techniques.

Transferable skills

Critical thinking, critical analysis and reasoning, problem solving, communication, teamwork and working effectively with others, organisational awareness, research skills, information literacy.

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 10 sessions of 1 hour 30 minutes (10%)
Seminars 5 sessions of 1 hour 30 minutes (5%)
Practical classes 10 sessions of 1 hour 30 minutes (10%)
Online learning (independent) (0%)
Other activity 30 minutes (0%)
Assessment 112 hours (75%)
Total 150 hours
Private study description

No private study requirements defined for this module.

Other activity description

112.5 hrs reading and PMA however the online system does not allow for decimals so I have added the half an hour missing from the Assessment section here.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group A1
Weighting Study time
Assessed work as specified by department 100% 112 hours

Assessed essay/coursework: 4500 words

Assessment group R
Weighting Study time
Assessed work as specified by department 100%

100% Post Module Assessment

Feedback on assessment

Written report to students as per WMG guidelines and assessment criteria. Further verbal feedback may be available to students on request.

Courses

This module is Core optional for:

  • Year 1 of TWMS-B9AA Postgraduate Healthcare Operational Management