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SO116-15 Sociology of Gender

Department
Sociology
Level
Undergraduate Level 1
Module leader
Caroline Wright
Credit value
15
Module duration
10 weeks
Assessment
100% coursework
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

What is the sociology of gender and why does it matter? This module answers this question drawing on the wealth of expertise within Warwick Sociology, taught by staff who teach, research and write about gender from a range of perspectives. The first part of the module addresses how gender is conceptualised, including central theories of gender and the importance of taking an intersectional approach. The second part of the module addresses the sociology of gender in everyday life, applying theory and concepts to demonstrate how gender shapes our social world. The module ends with a focus on feminist movements seeking to 'undo' gender and gendered inequalities.

Module aims

To develop knowledge of the sociology of gender, particularly in a British context. To enable students to understand how gender is socially constructed and the material consequences of this. To foster better understanding of intersectionality, that is the empirical and theoretical interconnections between gender and other axes of difference, such as class, (dis)ability, race and sexuality. To enable students to apply their understanding to key areas of everyday life, such as popular culture, personal relationships, education, work and politics.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

SECTION 1: CONCEPTUALISING GENDER
Week 1 - Introduction to the Sociology of Gender
Week 2 - Theorising Sex and Gender
Week 3 - Intersections of Class, (Dis)ability, Race, Sexuality and Gender Identity

SECTION 2: GENDER IN EVERYDAY LIFE
Week 4 - Gender and Popular Culture
Week 5 - Gender, Intimacy and Family Life
Week 6 - Reading Week
Week 7 - Gender in Education
Week 8 - Gender at Work
Week 9 - Gender, State and Political Protest
Week 10- Undoing Gender: Feminist Movements and Social Transformation

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Knowledge of basic concepts in the sociology of gender, including what it means to understand gender as a social construction.
  • Ability to identify and characterise processes of the social construction of gender in different social settings and institutions.
  • Understanding of a range of sociological approaches to the study of gender in everyday life.
  • Knowledge of the intersections between gender and other axes of social difference and inequality, such as class, (dis)ability, race and sexuality.
  • Ability to draw on key module concepts, relevant scholarly literature and appropriate evidence and examples to produce a written discussion of a particular aspect of the social construction of gender and its material consequences.
Indicative reading list

Abbott, P. , Wallace, C. and Tyler, M. (2005), An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives (3rd edition), London: Routledge.
Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi (2014), We Should All Be Feminists, London: Fourth Estate.
Butler, J. (1990) Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, New York and London: Routledge.
Connell, R. W. (2002), Gender, Cambridge: Polity Press.
Connell, R. W. (2005), Masculinities, Cambridge: Polity Press.
Cranny-Francis, A. et al (2003) Gender Studies: Terms and Debates, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Davis, K. , Evans, M. and Lorber, l. (eds.) (2006), The Handbook of Gender and Women's Studies, London: Sage.
Evans, M. and Williams, C. (eds.) (2012), Gender: The Key Concepts, London: Routledge.
Gamble, Sarah (ed.). 2001. The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Postfeminism. London: Routledge.
Gill, Rosalind (2007), Gender and the Media. Cambridge: Polity Press.
Hines, S. and T. Sanger (eds.) (2010), Transgender Identities: Towards a Social Analysis of Gender Diversity, New York: Routledge.
hooks, bell (2004), We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity, New York: Routledge.
Jackson, S. and Scott, S. (eds.) (2002), Gender: A Sociological Reader, London: Routledge.
Jeans, Emma L. et al (eds.) (2011) Handbook of Gender, Work and Organization, Chichester: Wiley
Kehily, Mary Jane (2002), Sexuality, Gender and Schooling, London: Routledge Falmer.
Lutz, H., Vivar, MTH and Supik, Linda (eds.) (2011), Framing Intersectionality: Debates on a multi-faceted concept in gender studies, Farnham: Ashgate.
Lombard, Nancy (ed.) (2018) The Routledge Handbook of Gender and Violence, London: Routledge.
McRobbie, Angela (2009), The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change, London: Sage.
McDowell, Linda ( 2009) Working Bodies : Interactive service employment and workplace identities, Chichester: Wiley Blackwell.
Miller, Tina (2017) Making Sense of Parenthood : Caring, gender and family lives, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Mirza, S. (1992) Young, Female and Black, London: Routledge.
Mirza, Heidi (2009) Race, Gender and Educational Desire: Why black women succeed and fail. London and New York: Routledge.
Pilcher, J. and Whelehan, l. (2004), Fifty Key Concepts in Gender Studies, London: Sage.
Richardson, D. and Robinson, V. (eds.) (2008), Introducing Gender and Women's Studies (3rd edition), Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Ringrose, Jessica (2012), Postfeminist Education?: Girls and the Sexual Politics of Schooling, London: Routledge.
Skeggs, Beverley (1997), Formations of Class and Gender: Becoming Respectable, London: Sage.
Stryker, S. and Whittle, S. (2007) The Transgender Studies Reader, New York and Abingdon: Routledge.

Subject specific skills

Knowledge of basic concepts in the sociology of gender, including what it means to understand gender as a social construction.

Ability to identify and characterise processes of the social construction of gender in different social setting and institutions.

Understanding of a range of sociological approaches to the study of gender in everyday life.

Knowledge of the intersections between gender and other axes of social difference and inequality, such as class, (dis)ability, race and sexuality.

Ability to draw on key module concepts, relevant scholarly literature and appropriate evidence and examples to produce a written discussion of a particular aspects of the social construction of gender and its material consequences.

Transferable skills

Critical thinking

Communication - written and verbal

Teamwork and working effectively with others

Information literacy and research skills

Personal responsibility and motivation

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 9 sessions of 1 hour (6%)
Seminars 9 sessions of 1 hour (6%)
Private study 82 hours (55%)
Assessment 50 hours (33%)
Total 150 hours
Private study description

Reading and other preparation for seminars. Preparation and writing of formative work .

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Students can register for this module without taking any assessment.

Assessment group A1
Weighting Study time
Assessed Essay 100% 50 hours

Addressing one question chosen from a list of essay questions.

Feedback on assessment

Written feedback will be provided for all assessment.

Post-requisite modules

If you pass this module, you can take:

  • SO361-15 Sociology in the Workplace

Courses

This module is Core for:

  • Year 1 of USOA-L301 BA in Sociology

This module is Core optional for:

  • Year 1 of UHIA-VL13 Undergraduate History and Sociology
  • Year 1 of UPOA-ML13 Undergraduate Politics and Sociology

This module is Optional for:

  • Year 1 of ULPA-P301 Undergraduate Media and Creative Industries
  • Year 1 of USOA-L314 Undergraduate Sociology and Criminology
  • Year 1 of USOA-L311 Undergraduate Sociology and Quantitative Methods

This module is Core option list A for:

  • Year 1 of ULAA-ML34 BA in Law and Sociology (Qualifying Degree)

This module is Option list A for:

  • USOA-L301 BA in Sociology
    • Year 1 of L305 Sociology with Specialism in Cultural Studies
    • Year 1 of L303 Sociology with Specialism in Gender Studies
    • Year 1 of L304 Sociology with Specialism in Research Methods
    • Year 1 of L302 Sociology with Specialism in Social Policy
  • Year 1 of USOA-L311 Undergraduate Sociology and Quantitative Methods

This module is Option list G for:

  • Year 1 of UPHA-V7ML Undergraduate Philosophy, Politics and Economics