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Throughout the 2021-22 academic year, we will be prioritising face to face teaching as part of a blended learning approach that builds on the lessons learned over the course of the Coronavirus pandemic. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

PS372-15 The Psychology of Intellectual Disabilities and Sensory Impairments

Department
Psychology
Level
Undergraduate Level 3
Module leader
Jagjeet Jutley-Neilson
Credit value
15
Module duration
12 weeks
Assessment
33% coursework, 67% exam
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module covers fundamental areas and phenomena of Intellectual and Developmental disabilities, exploring competing perspectives, contemporary debates and important areas of application.

Module web page

Module aims

To provide students with the opportunity to

  • Become aware of the assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disabilities.
  • Engage and evaluate psychological research and methods of measurement and diagnosis of intellectual disability and sensory impairments.
  • Explore the types of research methods, theoretical perspectives and questions of value, culture and context
  • Broaden understanding and knowledge of Intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments from a pre-natal, post-natal and a life-span perspective.
  • Explore how knowledge from this module is an important area for educational or clinical psychologists.
  • Understand the historical perspective of care, the dynamics of caring for a child with an intellectual disability and/or sensory impairment.
  • Understand approaches to psychological intervention in relation to mental health, challenging behaviour and health promotion
Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

This module covers fundamental areas and phenomena of Intellectual and Developmental disabilities, exploring competing perspectives, contemporary debates and important areas of application. The module looks at Intellectual and sensory impairments pre-natal, post-natal and across the life-span. The module will explore the types of research methods, theoretical perspectives and questions of value, culture and context. The role of brain functioning will be considered throughout this module. This module will also identify how the skills and knowledge gained during this module are relevant to GBC competencies and training which are relevant to future work and studies in the area of Psychology. This module will be of particular interest for students who would like to explore a career as an educational or clinical psychologist.

In the context of contemporary societies and globalisation the field of Developmental Psychology is pivotal to understanding ourselves and others. It needs to be adequately theorised and researched to allow orientation to the psychological phenomena of contemporary individual, family and community lives. This module is aimed at developing in students the necessary knowledge to approach this.

The module will centre around the material being delivered in lectures as well as activities within seminar and Moodle work. All course materials, including all lecture power points and overheads will be available on Moodle. Use will be made of audio and video materials to give examples and explore the approaches and issues involved in the module. Opportunities will be provided for class discussion and consideration and reflection on the relationship of the teaching content to the students’ experience.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Identify and appreciate differences in cognitive, social and emotional, behavioural development of individuals with intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments.
  • Enter into theoretical and evidential debates, and evaluate positions taken by researchers on key issues in intellectual disability and sensory impairment research.
  • Identify and analyse methodologies used for the measurement and diagnosis of intellectual disabilities by researchers, educational and clinical psychologists.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of concepts, perspectives, and research methods in the neurobiology of brain development and the effects of genetic and environmental factors in the development of intellectual disability and sensory impairments.
Indicative reading list

Emerson, E. (2012). Clinical psychology and people with intellectual disabilities. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
e-book - http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=361876&src=0

Recommended
Carr, A., Linehan, C., O'Reilly, G., Walsh, P. N., & McEvoy, J. (Eds.). (2016). The handbook of intellectual disability and clinical psychology practice. Routledge.
Harris, J.C., (2010). Intellectual Disability: a guide for families and professionals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Goodey, C. F. (2016). A history of intelligence and 'intellectual disability': The shaping of psychology in early modern europe. Routledge.

Lightfoot, C. (2009). The Development of Children. 6th ed. New York: Worth Publishers.
Jacobson, J. W., Mulick, J. A., & Rojahn, J. (Eds.). (2007). Handbook of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Springer Science & Business Media.
Kaufman, A. S. (2018). Contemporary intellectual assessment: Theories, tests, and issues. Guilford Publications.
Roth, I. (2010). The Autism Spectrum in the 21st Century: exploring psychology, biology and best practice. London: Jessica Kingsley

Subject specific skills

awareness of the assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disabilities
evaluation of psychological research and methods of measurement and diagnosis
Understand the historical perspective of care
Understand approaches to psychological intervention

Transferable skills

effective communication skills to develop a cogent argument supported by relevant evidence and being sensitive to the needs and expectations of an audience;
familiarity with collecting and organising stored information found in library book and journal collections, and online, critically evaluating primary and secondary sources;
effective personal planning skills

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 12 sessions of 2 hours (16%)
Seminars 5 sessions of 1 hour (3%)
Other activity 5 hours (3%)
Private study 116 hours (77%)
Total 150 hours
Private study description

116 hour guided independent study

Other activity description

Reading Group alternate weeks.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group D1
Weighting Study time
Essay 33%
Online Examination 67%
  • Online examination: No Answerbook required
Feedback on assessment

Written feedback and a provisional mark will be given within 20 working days following the submission date (as per the student charter) for coursework. The mark remains provisional until ratified by the External Examiner and the Examination Board.

Past exam papers for PS372

Pre-requisites

To take this module, you must have passed:

Courses

This module is Optional for:

  • Year 3 of UPSA-C800 Undergraduate Psychology
  • Year 4 of UPSA-C801 Undergraduate Psychology (with Intercalated year)
  • Year 3 of UPSA-C804 Undergraduate Psychology with Education Studies

This module is Option list A for:

  • Year 3 of UPSA-C804 Undergraduate Psychology with Education Studies

This module is Option list B for:

  • Year 3 of UPHA-VL78 BA in Philosophy with Psychology
  • Year 4 of UPHA-VL79 BA in Philosophy with Psychology (with Intercalated year)
  • Year 1 of TPSS-C8P9 Postgraduate Taught Psychological Research

This module is Option list C for:

  • Year 3 of UPSA-C802 Undergraduate Psychology with Linguistics