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IB3M3-15 Acting Responsibly

Department
Warwick Business School
Level
Undergraduate Level 3
Module leader
Rachel Dickinson
Credit value
15
Module duration
10 weeks
Assessment
100% coursework
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

N/A.

Module web page

Module aims

The module is designed to:
1.To explore business ethics in and as practice;
2.To examine ethics from a embodied perspective, foregrounding the role of experience, emotions, bodily presence and performativity;
3.To develop understanding of the internal culture of an organisation and factors that inhibit and/or enhance ethical behaviour and relationships;
4.To understand how moral and ethical judgement, reasoning and decision making is shaped and the role that self knowledge and reflective practice play in this.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

To create a meaningful culture of participation that is both effective, sustainable and socially responsible we cannot think about organisational structure and the management of this without thinking about what behaviours are required to realise these in practice.
Business ethics is a huge and complex field, which cannot be fully explored or comprehended within the context of a standalone module. What Acting Responsibly sets out to do is explore the question of what it means to act responsibly in business today together with how business ethics play out in practice. Designed around corporate morality and ethical reasoning, the module is contextualised using high profile scandals, past, present and emergent, placing emphasis on self-inquiry and collective responsibility. The ethical dilemma's faced by individual and or organisations will be used to question the values we hold, what and who shapes them and how they inform the choices we make. Using drama and theatre based approaches, students work in participatory and collaborative ways to help negotiate the the ambiguity and uncertainty that surrounds Business Ethics today. Exploratory scene work, scripted and improvised, will be used regularly as learning resources with which to identify the conditions that inhibit, enhance or reproduce behaviours in the workplace, and the extent to which ethical behaviour is contextual and situational.
There is an expectation and reliance on reflective practice as being central to both understanding and knowledge development in this module, supported through individual deliberation, reflective practice and open dialogue. Content will actively encourage participants to make connections between good management and principles that often influence and shape attitude, expectations and behaviour. The critical distance provided through in-role work will present students with alternative ways to express themselves, for example by stepping into the shoes of Leaders, Managers, and employees. Participants will adopt the role of documentary filmmakers. The film component being introduced and used as a sense-making tool designed to help conceptualise understanding and engagement with content and their critical understanding/reflection and analysis of materials and experiences introduced. The approach encourages critical engagement and consideration of the conditions required for building a healthy socially responsible organisation and what role business education can play in producing socially responsible and ethically motivated graduates.
Subject knowledge, whether lecture-based or workshop generated will provide the opportunity for students to actively engage with and reflect on a range of materials e.g. academic literature, current issues, interviews, and student experience. Inclusive pedagogies being used to generate debate and encourage dialogue, and the reflections collected weekly used to build a community of practice, who together share ideas and opinions on experiences encountered. The podcast material is designed to accompany the practical workshops, extending and deepening themes introduced and experienced in class, for example; the role of behaviour, attitude and emotion in management and organisational life, including how people make decisions, model responsibility and create opportunities for embodied leadership, emotions at work, cultures of power, practical wisdom, governance.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate and understand theoretical concepts relating to corporate social responsibility. -
  • Develop relevant arguments and examples, in order to critically engage with a range of ethical positions / perspectives and generate new understanding. -
  • Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect on learning encountered / contribution in lecture / workshop and group contexts. -
  • Appreciate and understand the role of ethics in management in relation to own values and decision making. -
Indicative reading list

Essential reading:
Bolman, L and Deal, T (2017) Reframing Organisation: Artistry, Choice and Leadership, 6th Edition, London, John Wiley & Sons. Introduction: The Power of Reframing

  • Clegg, Kornberger and Rhodes, (2007) Business Ethics as Practice, British Journal of Management, 18: 107-122.
    Clegg, S, Kornberger, M, and Pitsis, T. (2016) 4th Ed, Managing Organisations, London: Sage. Chapter 9: Managing Power, Politics, and Decision Making in Organizations
  • Nolan’s Principles (1995) – The Seven Principles of Public Life https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-7-
    principles-of-public-life
  • McGrath, J (2009) Theatre and Democracy, Cambridge Journals, 13th June 2009, -
    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/login;jsessionid=D66E10B506519D5A28AC02C0EF18A43B.journals
  • Mele, D. (2012) Management Ethics, London: Palgrave IESE Business Collection - Chapter 6: Moral Competencies of The Manager
  • Nonaka, I, Chia, R, Holt, R and Peltokorpi, V. (2014) Wisdom, management and organisation, Management Learning, 45 (4): 365-376.
  • Sims, R, Brinkman, J. (2003) Enron Ethics (Or: Culture Matters more than Codes), Journal of Business Ethics, 45: 243-256 Robinson, S, and Dowson, P. (2012) Business Ethics in Practice, London: cipd - Chapter 1: Are we still the good guys? - Introducing Ethics in Business
  • Shotter, J and Tsoukas, H. (2014) In Search of Phronesis: Leadership and the Art of Judgment, Academy of Management Learning & Education, 2014, Vol. 13, No. 2, 224–243
  • Stacey, R. (2012) Tools and Techniques of Leadership and Management, London: Routledge - Chapter 9: The Leadership and Management 'Techniques' of Practical Judgement
  • Weick, K. (1995) Sensemaking in Organizations, CA: Sage - Chapter 2: Seven Properties of Sensemaking
Subject specific skills
  • Articulate and apply practical, analytical and study skills required for creative and innovative approaches to understanding ethics as an embodied practice.
    -Demonstrate understanding and ability to adopt an ethical point of view and apply in a range of different organisational contexts.
Transferable skills
  • Recognise the value and place of experiential learning in their study and professional development
  • Work creatively and collaboratively to build peer relationships which recognise the collective diversity, strengths, interests and knowledge of the team.
  • Reflect on their own and group progress in relation to course content and learning intentions
  • Negotiate and find consensus in a team based challenges
  • Model flexibility in their learning
  • Use dialogue to reflect on, build and communicate ideas.
  • Appreciate and understand how to select / capture / record / edit material to help communicate understanding according to audience and context in an informative and creative way

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 8 sessions of 1 hour (5%)
Project supervision 1 session of 1 hour (1%)
Practical classes 10 sessions of 2 hours (13%)
Private study 48 hours (32%)
Assessment 73 hours (49%)
Total 150 hours
Private study description

Private Study.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group A
Weighting Study time
Individual Assessment (15 CATS) 70% 51 hours

Reflective essay

Group Work (15 CATS) 30% 22 hours

10 min film with Viva

Feedback on assessment

Feedback via My.WBS.

Courses

This module is Optional for:

  • UIBA-N203 BSc in International Management
    • Year 4 of N203 International Management
    • Year 4 of N203 International Management
    • Year 4 of N238 International Management with Finance
    • Year 4 of N256 International Management with Marketing
    • Year 4 of N236 Management with Digital Innovation (with Placement Year)
  • UIBA-N201 BSc in Management
    • Year 3 of N201 Management
    • Year 3 of N20B Management
    • Year 3 of N230 Management with Finance
    • Year 3 of N232 Management with Finance
    • Year 3 of N250 Management with Marketing
  • Year 4 of UIBA-MN33 Law and Business Three Year (Qualifying Degree)
  • Year 2 of UIBA-NN35 Undergraduate Accounting and Finance
  • UIBA-N4N7 Undergraduate Accounting and Finance (with Foundation Year and Intercalated Year/Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
    • Year 5 of N4N7 Accounting and Finance (Foundation Year and Intercalated)
    • Year 5 of N4N8 Accounting and Finance (Foundation Year and UPP)
  • Year 4 of UIBA-N4N4 Undergraduate Accounting and Finance (with Foundation Year)
  • UIBA-NN36 Undergraduate Accounting and Finance (with Intercalated Year/Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
    • Year 4 of NN36 Accounting and Finance (Intercalated)
    • Year 4 of NN37 Accounting and Finance (Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
  • Year 3 of UIBA-N212 Undergraduate Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Year 4 of UIBA-N1R1 Undergraduate International Business with French
  • Year 4 of UIBA-N1R2 Undergraduate International Business with German
  • Year 4 of UIBA-N1R3 Undergraduate International Business with Italian
  • Year 4 of UIBA-N1R4 Undergraduate International Business with Spanish
  • Year 3 of UIBA-MN31 Undergraduate Law and Business Studies
  • UIBA-MN32 Undergraduate Law and Business Studies
    • Year 3 of MN32 Law and Business Studies (Four-Year)
    • Year 4 of MN32 Law and Business Studies (Four-Year)
  • Year 4 of UIBA-MN35 Undergraduate Law and Business Studies with Intercalated Year (3+1)
  • Year 5 of UIBA-MN36 Undergraduate Law and Business Studies with Intercalated Year (4+1)
  • UIBA-N20G Undergraduate Management (with Foundation Year and Intercalated Year/Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
    • Year 4 of N20G Management (Foundation Year and Intercalated)
    • Year 4 of N20H Management (Foundation Year and UPP)
    • Year 4 of N23B Management with Finance (with Foundation Year and Intercalated Year)
    • Year 4 of N23C Management with Finance (with Foundation Year and Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
    • Year 4 of N25B Management with Marketing (with Foundation Year and Intercalated Year)
    • Year 4 of N25C Management with Marketing (with Foundation Year and Undergraduate Partnership Programme)
  • UIBA-N20A Undergraduate Management (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N20A Management (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23A Management with Finance (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N25A Management with Marketing (with Foundation Year)
  • UIBA-N20E Undergraduate Management (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N20E Management (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23N Management with Accounting (with Foundation Year and Placement Year)
    • Year 4 of N23M Management with Accounting (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23E Management with Digital Innovation (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23F Management with Entrepreneurship (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23D Management with Finance (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N254 Management with Marketing (with Foundation Year)
    • Year 4 of N23P Management with Strategy and Organisation (with Foundation Year)