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Throughout the 2021-22 academic year, we will be prioritising face to face teaching as part of a blended learning approach that builds on the lessons learned over the course of the Coronavirus pandemic. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

ET213-30 Linguistics: Structure, Sound and Meaning

Department
Applied Linguistics
Level
Undergraduate Level 2
Module leader
Christopher Strelluf
Credit value
30
Module duration
20 weeks
Assessment
50% coursework, 50% exam
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module expands on concepts introduced during ET118: Linguistics: Understanding Language in order to provide core knowledge and skills for students in all fields of language study. It aims to:
-Familiarise students with the phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and meaning systems of the world’s languages.
-Introduce methodologies from a range of linguistic disciplines to document, study, and analyse language data.
-Engage students in linguistic analysis within a language and cross-linguistically, both synchronically and diachronically.
-Introduce research about and approaches to subfields of linguistics, such as language acquisition and language change.

Module web page

Module aims

The module aims to:

  • Provide rigorous instruction in six core domains of linguistics, as established by the
    UK Quality Code for Higher Education Subject Benchmark Statement: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.
  • Expand on concepts introduced during ET118: Linguistics: Understanding Language in order to build core knowledge and skills for students in all fields of language study.
  • Introduce methodologies from a range of linguistic disciplines to document, study, and analyse language data.
  • Engage students in linguistic analysis within a language and cross-linguistically, both synchronically and diachronically.

This module will contribute primarily to the achievement of Course Aims #1, #2, #4 and #7:

  1. Provide a thorough grounding in theories and research findings related to intercultural interaction and linguistics.
  2. Give students an in-depth understanding and awareness of the nature of generic, discoursal and linguistic features relevant to different cultural and professional contexts.
  3. Enable students to analyse cross-linguistic features and contexts, and authentic cross-cultural and intercultural discourses using both quantitative and qualitative methods.
  4. Enable students to undertake an in-depth study of issues relating to intercultural linguistics.
Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

Illustrative Weekly Syllabus
Autumn Term –topics include
Comparing and classifying world languages
Morphology
Nouns, pronouns and nominal categories
Verbs, verbal categories and other word classes
Syntax: Coding grammatical relations
Syntax: Alignment and marking
Syntax: Clause types and complex sentences
Morpho-syntactic change

Spring Term
Consonants and vowels
Phonological analysis
Suprasegmental features
Sound change
Perception
Meaning theories and theories of meaning
Reference
Implicature and speech acts
Metaphor

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Upon successful completion of this module, students should understand a number of topics in linguistics. Students should then be able to:• Describe phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic patterns of the languages of the world.• Label phonetic, phonological, morpho-syntactic, and semantic/pragmatic features of languages with disciplinary terminology.• Analyze raw linguistic data to determine features of a language or dialect.• Categorize changes in languages and dialects resulting from language internal and external factors.• Identify physiological structures and psychological factors relevant to language production, perception, and interpretation.• Propose appropriate methodologies to document and study language.• Discuss core theories, findings, and approaches from a range of linguistic disciplines.
Indicative reading list

Brown, P. & Levinson, S. C. 1987. Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Burridge, K. & Bergs, A. (2016). Understanding language change. Routledge.
Grice, H.P. 1991. Studies in the way of words. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Haspelmath, M., & Sims, A. (2013). Understanding morphology. Routledge.
Kennedy, R. (2017). Phonology: A coursebook. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Labov, W. (1994). Principles of language change, vol. 1, Internal factors. Oxford: Blackwell.
Ladefoged, P. & Disner, S.F. (2012). Vowels and consonants (3rd edn). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
Ladefoged, P., & Maddieson, I. (2008). The sounds of the world’s languages (2nd edn). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
Lakoff, G. (2002). Moral Politics: How Liberals and Conservatives Think. University of Chicago Press.
Lycan, W.G. (2000). Philosophy of language: A contemporary introduction. London: Routledge.
Payne, T. E. (1997). Describing morphosyntax: A guide for field linguists. Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press.
Tallerman, M. (2014). Understanding syntax. Routledge.
Velupillai, V. (2012). An introduction to linguistic typology. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing.
Whaley, L. J. (1996). Introduction to typology: the unity and diversity of language. London: Sage Publications.

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Research element

-Students complete an independently designed and directed small-scale research project.
-Students work from real-world linguistic datasets compiled from ongoing research.

Interdisciplinary

-Students practice foundational linguistic analysis skills that transfer to branches of psychology, cognitive science, speech pathology, language teaching and learning, literacy studies, and computational language processing and production.

International

-Students engage with datasets drawn from a wide range of languages, increasing cross-linguistic exposure and providing pathways to multilingualism.

Subject specific skills
  1. Describe syntactic, morphological, phonological, phonetic, semantic and pragmatic patterns of the languages of the world.

  2. Identify physiological structures and psychological factors relevant to language acquisition, production, perception, and interpretation.

Transferable skills
  1. Analyse raw linguistic data to determine features of a language or dialect.

  2. Categorize changes in languages and dialects resulting from language internal and external factors.

  3. Write research-based work in a clear, informative, and structured way.

  4. Communicate clearly in oral presentation and academic discussion.

  5. Propose appropriate methodologies to document and study language.

  6. Label morpho-syntactic, phonetic, phonological, and semantic/pragmatic features of languages with disciplinary terminology.

  7. Discuss core theories, findings, and approaches from a range of linguistic disciplines.

Study time

Type Required
Lectures 18 sessions of 2 hours (12%)
Seminars 18 sessions of 1 hour (6%)
Other activity 4 hours (1%)
Private study 242 hours (81%)
Total 300 hours
Private study description

Reading subject materials
Homework tasks
Assignments
Revision

Other activity description

Revision sessions

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group C3
Weighting Study time
1500 word assignment 25%
1500 word assignment 25%
Online Examination 50%
  • Online examination: No Answerbook required
Feedback on assessment

Written feedback on the assignment will be provided on the Centre's standard feedback sheets, which conform to Faculty regulations. This will include both summary and detailed feedback. Where appropriate, additional feedback may be provided via personal meetings with the tutor.

Past exam papers for ET213

Courses

This module is Core for:

  • Year 2 of ULNA-R1Q2 Undergraduate French Studies with Linguistics
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R1Q3 Undergraduate French and Linguistics
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R2Q2 Undergraduate German Studies with Linguistics
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R2Q3 Undergraduate German and Linguistics
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R4Q1 Undergraduate Hispanic Studies and Linguistics
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R3Q3 Undergraduate Italian and Linguistics
  • Year 2 of UETA-X3Q5 Undergraduate Language, Culture and Communication
  • Year 2 of UETA-X3Q8 Undergraduate Language, Culture and Communication (with Intercalated Year)
  • Year 2 of UETA-X3Q6 Undergraduate Language, Culture and Communication (with Year Abroad)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q2T6 Undergraduate Linguistics with Arabic (with Year Abroad)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1R1 Undergraduate Linguistics with French
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1A1 Undergraduate Linguistics with French (with Intercalated Year)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1R2 Undergraduate Linguistics with German
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1A2 Undergraduate Linguistics with German (with Intercalated Year)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1A8 Undergraduate Linguistics with Japanese (with Intercalated Year)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q2T2 Undergraduate Linguistics with Japanese (with Year Abroad)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q2R5 Undergraduate Linguistics with Portuguese (with Year Abroad)
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q1A4 Undergraduate Linguistics with Spanish (with Intercalated Year)
  • Year 2 of ULNA-R9Q1 Undergraduate Modern Languages and Linguistics
  • ULNA-R9Q2 Undergraduate Modern Languages with Linguistics
    • Year 2 of R9Q2 Modern Languages with Linguistics
    • Year 3 of R9Q2 Modern Languages with Linguistics
  • Year 2 of UPSA-C802 Undergraduate Psychology with Linguistics
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q310 in English Language and Linguistics
  • Year 2 of UETA-Q311 in English Language and Linguistics (with Intercalated year)

This module is Core option list C for:

  • Year 3 of ULNA-R9Q2 Undergraduate Modern Languages with Linguistics