Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Throughout the 2020-21 academic year, we will be adapting the way we teach and assess your modules in line with government guidance on social distancing and other protective measures in response to Coronavirus. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

EQ939-30 Education and Society (online)

Academic year
20/21
Department
Centre for Education Studies
Level
Taught Postgraduate Level
Module leader
Jacqueline Dynes
Credit value
30
Module duration
26 weeks
Assessment
100% coursework
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module aims to offer a critical framework for understanding education in its wider social and historical contexts. The module focuses principally on the UK but also considers global developments and offers students opportunities to consider their own national contexts. You will explore the social purposes of education, considering issues such as: education and social justice; education, the state and social provision; education and the economy; educational inequalities and widening participation. The module will look at how shifts in these areas have informed developments in schools, post-compulsory and higher education

Module aims

This module is the online varient of IE936 and is suitable for part time students. The module aims to offer a critical framework for understanding education in its wider social and historical contexts. The module focuses principally on the UK but also considers global developments and offers students opportunities to consider their own national contexts.
The module will explore the social purposes of education, considering issues such as: education and social justice; education, the state and social provision; education and the economy; educational inequalities; widening participation. It will look at how shifts in these areas have informed developments in schools, post-compulsory and higher education.
This module contributes to the achievement of all four aims of the MA in Education and provides opportunities for students to:

  • Engage at an advanced level with issues of significant concern to those involved in education.
  • Evaluate the most recent developments in research and policy initiatives on local, national and international levels.
  • Develop professionally by considering the implications of the module for practice, including their own practice, where appropriate.
  • Develop, utlilise and evaluate a range of investigation methods (by completing study units tasks, preparatory activities and a 4,000 or 5,000 word assignment.
    There are additional module-specific aims. Students should:
  • Develop their critical understanding of theoretical and empirical research into education policy, sociology and practice.
  • Deepen their insights into the dynamic interaction that exists between education research, theory, policy and practice.
  • Engage critically with current research on educational policy and decision-making.
  • Develop a critical understanding of contemporary debates on education in relation to the state, economy and communities.
  • Develop a critical understanding of educational inequalities, widening participation and social justice.
Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

01 Introduction to the module.
02 What is Education?
(incl. learning journeys; overview of course; ground rules; intro to assignment)
03 Education in Post-Welfare Society/ Education and Social Justice
04 Schools and Schooling: overview and issues
05 Post-Compulsory Education & Training/ Higher Education: overview and issues
06 Equality and Diversity in Education: experiences and achievement
07 Global Perspectives on Education
08 Education Policy

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • By the end of the module, students should be conversant with:· Pertinent educational and social research [types of research, key findings, contribution to theory, practice and policy initiatives at (inter-)national level]
  • Recent theoretical and policy developments
  • By the end of the module students should have:· Deepened and extended their understanding of key concepts and issues in educational policy, theory and provision
  • Deepened their insight into the principles of social justice in education
Indicative reading list

Abbott, I., Rathbone, M. and Whitehead, P. (2013) Educational Policy. London: Sage.
Adams, P. (2014) Policy and Education. Abingdon: Routledge.
Avis, J. (2009) Education, Policy and Social Justice: Learning and Skills. London: Continuum.
Ball, S., Maguire, M. and Braun, A. (2012) How Schools Do Policy: Policy Enactments in Secondary
Bell, L. and Stevenson, H. (2006) Education Policy: Process, Themes and Impact. Abingdon: Routledge.
Ball, S. (2017) The Education Debate. Bristol: Policy Press.
Barker, B. (2010) The Pendulum Swings; Transforming School Reform. Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham Books.
Benn, M. (2011) School Wars: The Battle for Britain's Education. London: Verso.
Cohan, A. and Honigsfeld-Rowman, A. (2013) Breaking the Mould of Education: Innovative and Successful Practices for Student Engagement, Empowerment, and Motivation. London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
Dyson, A. (1997) Social and educational disadvantage: reconnecting special needs education, British Journal of Special Education, 24(4), 152-157.
Espelage, D. and Swearer, S. (2008) Addressing research gaps in the intersection between homophobia and bullying, School Psychology Review 37(2), 155-159.
Flint, J. and Peim, M. (2012) Rethinking the Education Improvement Agenda: a critical philosophical approach (London: Continuum).
Gunter, H., Hall, D. and Mills, C. (2014) (eds.) Education Policy Research: Design and Practice at a Time of Rapid Reform. London: Bloomsbury Academic.

Leadbeater, C. (2012) Innovation in Education: Lessons from Pioneers Around the World. London: Bloomsbury.
Mansell, W. (2007) Education by Numbers: The Tyranny of Testing. London: Methuen.
Moore, R. (2004) Education and society: issues and explanations in the sociology of education. Cambridge: Polity.
Nind, M. (2005) Inclusive education: discourse and action, British Educational Research Journal, 31(2), 269-275.
Orange, C. (2002) The Quick Reference Guide to Educational Innovations: Practices, Programs, Policies, and Philosophies. London: Sage Publications.
Pritchard, A. (2008) Ways of Learning: learning theories and learning styles in the classroom, (2nd Edition) London: David Fulton.
Perry, E. and Francis, B. (2010) The Social Class Gap for Educational Achievement: a review of the literature. London: RSA.
Reay, D. (2012) What would a socially just education system look like? London: Centre for Labour and Social Studies.
Saunders, L. (2007) (ed.) Educational Research and Policy-Making: Exploring the border country between research and policy. Abingdon: Routledge.
Skelton, C., Francis, B. and Read, B. (2009) "Brains before 'beauty'?" High achieving girls, school and gender identities, Educational Studies, 36(2), 185-194.
Stevenson, J. (2012) Black and minority ethnic student degree retention and attainment. London: Higher Education Academy.
Thomas, G. (2013) Education: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP.
Warmington, P. (2014) Black British Intellectuals and Education: multiculturalism's hidden history. London: Routledge.
Warmington, P. (2015) Dystopian social theory and education, Educational Theory, 65 (3): 265-281.
Wilkinson, R. and Pickett, K. (2009) The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. London: Allen Lane.

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Interdisciplinary

This module considers education from several angles and as such considers education from the position of different disciplines. Specifically:
Philosophically – considering underpinning ideas (beliefs, morals, values)
Sociologically– thinking about education, socialisation and wider society (ideologies, power, institutions, identities)
Historically – understanding change, development, influences and comparison
Psychologically- questioning how we learn, development, cognition

Subject specific skills

Students should demonstrate a critical understanding of:

  • the underlying values, theories and concepts relevant to education
  • the diversity of learners and the complexities of the education process
  • societal and organisational structures and purposes of educational systems, and the possible implications for learners and the learning process

Students should be able to constructively critique theories, practice and research in the area of education.

Transferable skills
  • Analysis and decision making
  • Cognitive flexibility
  • Common sense
  • Communication skills
  • Complex problem solving
  • Confidence
  • Critical thinking
  • Data handling
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Initiative and also follow instructions
  • Intellectual ability
  • International cultural awareness
  • Interpersonal and communication
  • Judgement and decision making
  • Management of learning
  • Motivation, tenacity, commitment
  • Negotiation
  • Passion
  • Personal development skills
  • Persuading/influencing
  • Planning and organisational skills
  • Problem solving
  • Quality Control
  • Reasoning
  • Self-management/resilience
  • Technical skills
  • Using IT effectively

Study time

Type Required
Online learning (independent) 10 sessions of 3 hours (10%)
Private study 270 hours (90%)
Total 300 hours
Private study description

Independent study hours include background reading, completing reading/other tasks in preparation for timetabled teaching sessions, undertaking research using the library resources, follow-up reading work, working on individual and group projects, the completion of formative and summative assignments, revision.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You must pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group A1
Weighting Study time
Essay 100%
Feedback on assessment

Students will be given formative feedback on course activities; these are preparatory steps towards developing the assignment. Students will receive formative feedback upon completing and submitting these activities to the Course Tutor (via e-submission). This is an opportunity for students to receive feedback related to the assignment (in addition to the formal feedback received upon submitting the assignment).\r\nStudents will also be given written feedback on the Assignment Proposal that is a compulsory activity before students embark on the 5,000 word assignment.\r\n

Courses

This module is Core optional for:

  • Year 1 of TEQA-X35R Postgraduate Taught Education (Part-time - 2 year)
  • TEQA-X35S

This module is Optional for:

  • Year 1 of RIEA-X3X8 Postgraduate Research Doctorate in Education
  • Year 1 of TIEA-X31L Postgraduate Taught Educational Innovation
  • Year 1 of TIEA-X31M Postgraduate Taught Educational Leadership and Management
  • Year 1 of TEQA-C8X3 Postgraduate Taught Psychology and Education
  • Year 1 of TEQA-C8X4 Postgraduate Taught Psychology and Education
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V9 Postgraduate Taught in Islamic Education: Theory and Practice (Part-time - 2 years)
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V5 Postgraduate Taught in Islamic Education: Theory and Practice (Part-time - 3 years)
  • Any other Masters level course in the University for which deemed appropriate