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Throughout the 2020-21 academic year, we will be adapting the way we teach and assess your modules in line with government guidance on social distancing and other protective measures in response to Coronavirus. Teaching will vary between online and on-campus delivery through the year, and you should read guidance from the academic department for details of how this will work for a particular module. You can find out more about the University’s overall response to Coronavirus at: https://warwick.ac.uk/coronavirus.

EQ934-30 Foundations of Islamic Education

Academic year
20/21
Department
Centre for Education Studies
Level
Taught Postgraduate Level
Module leader
Abdullah Sahin
Credit value
30
Module duration
10 weeks
Assessment
100% coursework
Study location
University of Warwick main campus, Coventry
Introductory description

This module helps you to explore philosophical, historical and theological foundations of Islamic Education through engaging with modern educational theories and pedagogic models. You will develop knowledge, understanding and critical insights into the fundamentals of Islamic educational thought, practice and values and begin to form your own philosophy of education by critically engaging with both the Islamic and Western traditions of education thought and practice.

Module aims

To enable students to explore philosophical, historical and theological foundations of Islamic Education through engaging with modern educational theories and pedagogic models.

Critically analyse perceptions of education, nature of educational values and transmission of knowledge and culture within historical and contemporary Muslim societies.

Identify and critically discuss the contemporary challenges and critical issue in the field with special reference to the role of Islamic Education in modern culturally and religiously plural secular societies.

Critically explore the inter-disciplinary nature of Islamic Education with a special emphasis on the relevance of empirical research methodologies in the field.

Critically consider integrating contemporary Educational Studies and research into Islamic Education, especially research springing from the Social Sciences directed towards pedagogy and curriculum.

Develop competence to identify areas of research and structure personal research interests and projects in the field.

Facilitate reflective practice in Islamic Education and motivate students to continue with their professional development by engaging with further relevant PG level academic programmes in the field.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

Introduction/orientation; Conceptual analysis of central terms in educational theory; Examining diverse perceptions of Islamic Education; Philosophical/historical and theological foundations of Muslim educational thought; Educational aims and values in diverse traditions of education in Islam; Exploring organisation of curriculum, teaching and learning methods in diverse formal and informal Islamic educational settings, Critical Issues/challenges facing Islamic Education in contemporary Muslim minority and majority societies, Developing scholarly and empirical research strategies in Islamic Education.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Develop knowledge, understanding and critical insights into the fundamentals of Islamic educational thought, practice and values.
  • Demonstrate competence to think educationally about Islam and Show reflective engagement with critical issues and challenges informing contemporary practice of Islamic Education.
  • Facilitate students' competence to form their own philosophy of education by critically engaging with both the Islamic and Western traditions of educational thought and pedagogic practice.
  • Enable students to critically explore the inter-disciplinary nature of Islamic Education with a special emphasis on the relevance of empirical research methodologies in the field.
Indicative reading list

Makdisi, G (1981) The Rise of Colleges: Institutions of Learning in Islam and the West, Edinburgh
University Press, Edinburgh.
Rahman, F (1984) Islam and Modernity: Transformation of an Intellectual Tradition, University of
Chicago Press, London.
Rosenthal, F (2007) Knowledge Triumphant; the concept of knowledge in medieval Islam, Brill,
Leiden.
Sahin, A (2014) New Direction in Islamic Education: pedagogy and identity formation, Kube
publishing, Leicestershire.
Bartlet, S and Burton, D.M (2007) Introduction to Education Studies, Sage London.
Dewey, J (1997) Experience and Education, Touchstone, New York
Freire, F (2006) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Continuum, London.
Allen, A and Goddard, R (2017) Education and Philosophy: an introduction, Sage, London.
Bloom, B. S., (ed), et al. (1969) Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of
educational goals. Handbook I: Cognitive Domain, McKay, New York.
Coulby D (2002) Beyond the National Curriculum: School Knowledge and Society in the UK and
Europe, Taylor & Francis, London.
Copley, T (2008) Teaching Religion: sixty years of religious education in England and Wales,
University of Exeter press, Exeter.
Crawford A et al (eds)(2005) Teaching And Learning Strategies For The
Thinking Classroom, International Debate Education Association, New York.
Cook, B (2011) Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought: A Compendium of Parallel
English-Arabic Texts (Islamic Translation Series), University of Chicago Press, London.
Haw, K (1998) Educating Muslim Girls, Open University Press, Buckingham.
Francis, L at all (1996) Research in Religious Education, Gracewing, London.
Grimmitt, M. (ed.) (2000) Pedagogies of Religious Education, Mc Crimmons, Essex.
Hefner, R W and Zaman, M Q (eds) (2007) Schooling Islam: The culture and politics of modern
Muslim education, Princeton University Press, Princeton.
Lewis, P (2009) Young, British and Muslim, Continuum, London.
Luce, P (2009) Teaching about Religions in European School Systems: Policy issue and trends,
London, Alliance Publishing Trust.
Lawton, D and Gordon (2002) A History of Western Educational Ideas, Woburn, London.
Metcalf, B.D (1984) Moral Conduct and Authority: the place of Adab in South Asian Islam,
University of California press, London.
Moon, J.A. (2004) A Handbook of Reflective and Experiential Learning: theory and practice,
Routledge Falmer, London.
Pollard, A. (2008) Reflective teaching: evidence-informed professional practice, Continuum,
London.
Pritchart, A (2008) Ways of Learning, David Fulton Publishers, London.
Robinson, F (1996) Knowledge, its transmission and the making of Muslim societies, in F.
Robinson (ed) The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Islamic World, (pp.208-250), Cambridge
uni press, Cambridge.
Sahin, A ( 2011) "The complex inheritance of first generation; identity, secularity and education",
Oasis, V.6 No 12, pp.45-50
Sahin A (2010) "The Contribution of Religious Education to Social and Community Cohesion: an
Islamic educational perspective" in Michael H. Grimmitt (ed) Religious Education and Social and
Community Cohesion: Challenges and Opportunities, Great Wakering, UK, McCrimmons
Publishing Co. Ltd
Sahin, A (2005), "Exploring the religious life-world and attitude toward Islam among British
Muslim adolescents", in Religion, Education and Adolescence, eds L Francis, M Robbins & J Astley,
Cambridge Printing, Cambridge (pp. 164 — 184)
Saliba G (2007) Islamic Science and the making of the European Renaissance, MIT press, London.
SchOn, D. (1983) The Reflective Practitioner: How professionals think in action, Basic Books, New
York.
Smith, E (2012) Key Issues in Education and Social Justice (Education Studies: Key Issues), Sage,
London.
Tan, C (2011) Islamic Education and Indoctrination: The Case in Indonesia, Routledge, London.
Tibawi, A (1972) Islamic Education, Luzac and Company Ltd, London
Zaman, M Q (2007) The Ulama in Contemporary Islam: Custodians of Change, Princeton
University Press.
Zine, J (2008) Canadian Islamic Schools: Unravelling the Politics of Faith, Gender, Knowledge, and
Identity, University of Toronto Press, London.
Al-Zarnuji, (2003) Instruction of the Student: The Method of Learning, Starlatch Press, New York.

View reading list on Talis Aspire

Interdisciplinary

The module introduces students to the inter-disciplinary nature of Islamic Education. Foundations of education in Islam are explored through engaging with the religious, theological as well as philosophical, sociological and contemporary educational, pedagogic and social scientific studies. The course enables students to engage with a critical dialogue between Islamic and modern educational theories and pedagogic models. The module further highlights the need to adopt an inter-disciplinary analysis framework while engaging with the issues related to ‘Education, Islam and Muslim’ intersection. Participants coming from traditional Muslim seminaries have the opportunity of integrating their traditional education with modern educational and pedagogic studies.

Subject specific skills
  • Develop knowledge, understanding and critical insights into the fundamentals of Islamic educational thought and practice
  • Critically examining the educational teachings and values in the foundational sources and traditions of education in Islam;
  • to develop critical insight into the relevant contemporary educational theory and pedagogic thought with special reference to examining the role of Islamic Education in modern multicultural and religious lydiverse secular societies;
  • independently gather, organize and critique knowledge gathered through primary and secondary sources on Islamic Education and practice of Islamic Education in Muslim minority and majority societies;
  • Demonstrate competence to think educationally about Islam and show reflective engagement with critical issues and challenges informing contemporary practice of Islamic Education.
  • proactively to formulate ideas and hypotheses and to evaluate these as part of their development a reflective practitioners in Islamic Education.
  • Show competence to critically explore the inter-disciplinary nature of Islamic Education with a special emphasis on the relevance of modern empirical research methodologies in the field
Transferable skills
  • clearly and accurately communicate and articulate their arguments/conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  • to take a proactive and self-reflective role in working and to develop professional relationships with others;
  • self direction and effective decision making in complex and unpredictable situations;
  • independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures continuing professional development;
  • critically engage in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and norms.
  • Demonstrate independent learning, self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level.

Study time

Type Required Optional
Lectures 10 sessions of 2 hours (7%)
Seminars 10 sessions of 1 hour (3%)
Tutorials (0%) 1 session of 15 minutes
Private study 270 hours (90%)
Total 300 hours
Private study description

Independent study hours include background reading, completing reading/other tasks in preparation for timetabled teaching sessions, undertaking research using the library resources, follow-up reading work, working on individual and group projects, the completion of formative and summative assignments, revision.

Costs

No further costs have been identified for this module.

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module.

Assessment group A1
Weighting Study time
Critical Review (2000 words) 40%
Long Essay (4000 words) 60%
Feedback on assessment

Written feedback on the assessed work, online, emails, Moodle and during the face to face tutorials.

Courses

This module is Core for:

  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V6 Postgraduate Award in Islamic Education

This module is Core optional for:

  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V7 Postgraduate Taught in Islamic Education: Theory and Practice (Full-time)
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V9 Postgraduate Taught in Islamic Education: Theory and Practice (Part-time - 2 years)
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3V5 Postgraduate Taught in Islamic Education: Theory and Practice (Part-time - 3 years)

This module is Optional for:

  • Year 1 of TEQA-X3R1 Postgraduate Religions, Society and Education
  • Year 1 of RIEA-X3X8 Postgraduate Research Doctorate in Education
  • Year 1 of TIEA-X30F Postgraduate Taught Childhood in Society
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X35Q Postgraduate Taught Education (Full-time)
  • Year 1 of TEQA-X35R Postgraduate Taught Education (Part-time - 2 year)
  • Year 1 of TIEA-X31L Postgraduate Taught Educational Innovation
  • TIEA-X31M Postgraduate Taught Educational Leadership and Management
    • Year 1 of X3M1 Educational Leadership and Management by Dissertation
    • Year 1 of X3M2 Educational Leadership and Management by Professional Route
  • TEQS-X3AN Postgraduate Taught Global Education and International Development
    • Year 1 of X3AN Global Education and International Development
    • Year 1 of X3AN Global Education and International Development